Trapdoor In The Sun

Alan Shanahan, Technician & Consultant

Developer Maturity

Leave a comment

Thirty-odd years ago, I wrote my first lines of BASIC code on an Apple II computer donated to my secondary school by some local businesses. We were the first of our school and, to some degree, our generation to have access to such a device. I was hooked from the word go. All these years and a few dozen jobs later, I can tell you I’ve seen the full spectrum of good and bad in the world of programming; I may even have contributed to the bad side, but I live in hope that most of what I produced was leaning towards the better side of things.

But I can see definite steps in my progression in those intervening years; let me focus on programming itself, or “development” as the industry likes to call it. Today, I have a very different mindset to that of my teen years. My young naive self revelled in the idea that you could type an arbitrary set of instructions into a machine and it could do the most marvellous things. Coding was an end in itself! It existed just so that beautiful programs could be written and run. I had a lot to learn.

Then I started working in the real world. My programs were now being used by real people, in a real business, every day. There was a huge amount of job satisfaction in that idea. Everything changed. My “hobby” was now something to take seriously and it had to perform to a new standard. But I didn’t fully realise that and I still saw programming as an isolated pursuit with its own intrinsic value; in my mind it was a primary activity with its own purpose rather than an enabler. This illustrated an immaturity in terms of my business viewpoint.

Many years later, I’ve managed programmers and development teams. Still doing that. I’ve designing solutions for customers that are implemented by these teams. I’ve seen and reviewed a lot of code. In that sea of code, the full spectrum of quality exists. Some bad practices can have a subjective slant to them, but other bad practices are just plain bad. I’ll tackle the subject of quality later, it’s just too big to even contemplate here. But one point on quality is worth reiterating here and now: quality is everyone’s responsibility. I won’t explain that further, I believe the words do that for themselves. You own quality. You own problems created by your programs, no matter how trivial. At least to some extent. You owe it to your team to properly ring fence and test scenarios your programs are supposed to handle. You owe it to the customers who are paying for your development efforts.

And what I have seen is a set of behaviour patterns that seem to be repeating.

Firstly, there is an obvious disconnect between some programmers and the end user they are programming for. Think about users. Someone will sit in front of a screen and use your programs. They are real people, no matter how distant they are, or how imaginary they seem.

Another misalignment I’ve seen is that some programmers don’t conceive that data represents real world things. Financial data represents money, real money, not imaginary money. This is important to customers. It’s their money, the life blood of their business, which would simply curl up and die without it.

Polish! Polish your code. Polish the user interface. Try to break your programs. Keep trying until they no longer break.

Open your mind. Let go. Don’t be afraid to rework what you’ve written. The best writers and authors do this regularly; that’s why they’re the best. Coding is not an end in itself, it’s a means to an end: the business aim is the end. Code is just an enabler.

Do these things…

…and you’ll be all grown up.

[Note: I’ve emphasised “some programmers” in this piece. I’ve worked and continue to work with many superb developers. It’s worth mentioning.]

Author: Alan Shanahan

Cloud computing professional, amateur drummer and other things. Doesn't take himself too seriously. He's got a fever ... and the only prescription is more cowbell.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s